New South Wales

Webinar Recordings

Below are the recordings and presentations from seminars that the NSW Branch have hosted.  The National Webinar Program can be viewed on Central Council's website.

 

Remote Work and Clean Energy Precincts in Australia (CEDA)

At this seminar, CEDA Economists James Brooks and Liam Dillon will present recent research on remote work in Australia and clean energy precincts respectively. 

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Consequences for land transport of Covid 19 and work from home

As COVID-19 slowly dissipated, working from home (WFH) continues to be popular, with support from notable numbers of employees and employers. With growing evidence that we have either reached, or appear to be close to, a level of WFH to some extent that might be described as an equilibrium outcome going forward, we need to update any travel behaviour response models that have been developed during the passage of the pandemic.

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Additive Growth

Productivity growth, the key driver of long-run growth in incomes, has slowed significantly in advanced economies over the past few decades. In this seminar, Angus Wheeler will present the main findings from the paper and discuss the important implications, including that we should expect slower long-term output and tax revenue growth, as well as smaller positive spillovers from R&D activity.

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The Deglobalisation Myth

For all the talk of near/re/on/friend-shoring, global supply chains have in fact been expanding. In a recent work commissioned by Hinrich Foundation, Thang Nguyen-Quoc (Oxford Economics) traces the evolution of global supply chain through the lens of intermediate goods trade.

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Housing Prices and Rents in Australia 1980-2023

The increasing cost and accessibility of housing is now a major public policy issue. The recent explosion of professional, political and public discussion on housing prices focuses on immediate events and often presents a partial explanation.

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The Perils of Economic Reform: A Cautionary Tale From Myanmar

For 650 days, the author and economics professor was unjustly incarcerated in a Myanmar jail on a trumped-up charge of being a spy. When he was imprisoned alongside Myanmar’s democratic leadership following the military coup in February 2021, Professor Turnell was an economic policy advisor to Myanmar’s leader, Aung San Suu Kyi.

This will be a compelling and insightful talk as Sean reflects on his deep commitment to using his economic expertise to promote social justice.

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Childcare Choices: What Parents Want

The Early Childhood Education and Care (ECEC) sector faces a host of problems from supply shortages, worker shortages and inflationary pressures. Ensuring parents are able to secure accessible and affordable childcare options is key to supporting women’s workforce participation, promoting productivity growth and assisting children’s development. Critical to addressing the problems plaguing the ECEC sector is understanding what parents want from ECEC services.

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Competition Economics: Is It Broken?

The NSW ESA Branch, together with the NSW WEN Branch, are pleased to welcome Dr Lilla Csorgo, Chief Economist of the Australian Competition & Consumer Commission (ACCC), to the ESA lunchtime seminar series. In this session, Dr Lilla Csorgo will present on the topic Competition Economics: Is It Broken?.

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Unpacking the Economic Impacts of Climate Change

In this lunch-time seminar, three leading economists - Professor Tom Kompas from the University of Melbourne, Emma Richardson from the Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water and Nicki Hutley, Independent Economist discuseds the economic impacts of climate change, what it looks like in Australia and how it affects regions, industries and policies. The session covered issues such as economic damages, what the economic modelling tells us in Australia and abroad, and implications for policymakers and businesses.

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Monsters in the Machine, Technology, Growth & Human Flourishing

A talk by Richard King, author of Here Be Monsters: Is Technology Reducing Our Humanity? (Monash University Publishing)

Technology is a constant in human affairs. The use of stone tools predates the emergence of humanity by some three million years, and helped to shape the beings we are now. We are Homo faber – ‘man the maker’ – the tool-using animal par excellence.

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Productivity in non-market services

The Commonwealth Productivity Commission’s 5-year Productivity Inquiry Report – Advancing Prosperity - was released in March. In this report, the Productivity Commission gives particular attention to the challenges Australia faces from the shift towards service industries. Almost 90% of Australians now work in service industries, including education, health, hospitality, retail and finance. It has traditionally been difficult to lift productivity in these sectors. Productivity in these areas can be hard to measure and achieve. In many cases, the goal will be to improve quality rather than reducing cost, but it remains important that we pursue productivity improvements in these areas.

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Recharging NSW's productivity with AI

With the release of ChatGPT—a ground-breaking AI-powered chatbot—automation has progressed from dull and repetitive tasks to complex and creative ones. The world is again being amazed by the speed at which artificial intelligence (AI) is developing.

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Discounting the Future Re-examined

Mike Smart, Chief Economist at IPART, discusses "Discounting the future re-examined: how climate change makes us think differently about the time value of money, and what that means for economic regulation".

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Teaching the CORE Curriculum

The conventional economics curriculum does not address the problems economists should be addressing. This is the view driving CORE EconCurriculum Open-access Resources in Economics.

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Australia's Great Depression

The Great Depression is still recognised as the worst economic crisis the world has faced.  Australia was hit particularly hard. Possibly one in three Australians were unemployed at the depths of the Depression.  

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Delivering Customer Value: A new framework for water regulation

All people in NSW expect safe reliable drinking water and wastewater services at a fair price. However, the environment in which monopoly water businesses plan and deliver services is changing. Population growth, climate change, economic shocks, digital technology and new government water strategies all present challenges that water businesses need to plan for and manage.

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Mixed Fortunes: The History of Tax Reform in Australia, Paul Tilley

Australia’s history is sprinkled with tax reform attempts – some successful, some not. This seminar explores that history through three phases. First, the establishment of the Constitution at Federation in 1901 and the 1942 unification of income tax. Second, the seminal Asprey review in 1975 that set up the major tax reforms of 1985 and then 2000. Third, the mixed efforts at tax reform, at both the Commonwealth and state levels, this century.

The seminar will examine the roles of foundational reviews, that establish the case for reform, and determinative reviews, that implement reform. It will assess both the political economy issues of policy making and the quality of the tax reforms that have been achieved in Australia. What makes a reform exercise work (or not)? How do we assess the quality of Australia’s tax reforms? What lessons are there for future tax reform exercises?

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China moving towards a high-income economy: challenges, opportunities and prospects

China’s economic growth is facing both headwinds and great potential. With per capita income level reaching US$12,000 in 2021, China is projected to become a high-income country soon.

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In Conversation with Prof. Henry Cutler

Aged care reform in Australia. Giving competition a chance to improve quality

The Royal Commission on Aged Care Quality and Safety concluded that residential aged care was delivering poor care quality, had little accountability, was devoid of quality information, and lacked consumer choice. The Australian Government responded in 2021 announcing 29 reforms to be implemented between 2021-25.  

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In Conversation with: Professor Bill Mitchell

Take a deep dive into debt and deficits with Professor Bill Mitchell - the founder of modern monetary theory – about modern monetary theory, its application to the current economic climate and what it can tell us about the future as we emerge from the pandemic

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Reaching for the Stars: Australian firms and the global productivity frontier

Raising productivity growth is essential to sustain further improvements in living standards, given headwinds from population ageing and the decline in Australia's terms of trade. Take a deep dive into recent research on productivity with Jonathan Hambur, Senior Research Manager at the Reserve Bank of Australia who will take us through research utilising a novel dataset to explore the factors driving productivity differentials.

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In Conversation with Ross Garnaut

Ross Garnaut delves into the economic impact of the pandemic, by exploring the challenges Australia carried into the pandemic, identifying alternative paths forward for our nation in the post-pandemic world, and demonstrating how Australia can reset its economy and build a successful future. 

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Women's Economic Security

With the Federal Government planning a Women’s Security Summit in September, Women in Economics NSW is drawing together an exceptional panel to explore the critical issue of women’s economic security. The focus of the Panel will be on what the experience of a working life facing workforce inequality, a gender pay gap, part time work and interrupted work patterns means for women approaching and over the course of their retirement.

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What is driving participation and diversity trends in economics?

There has been a stark decline in the size and diversity of the Year 12 Economics student population in Australia since the early 1990s. This paper asks: first, which school and individual characteristics are most strongly associated with choosing Economics? Second, what are students' perceptions of Economics? And third, what differences in perceptions of Economics exist by sex and socio-economic background?

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What the budget means for Women

Join our three incredible panellists – Nicki Hutley, Danielle Wood and Danielle Woolley - as we discuss what the Federal Budget means for women. Putting a gender lens on the Budget, we will cover a range of issues including superannuation, the gender pay gap, paid parental leave, violence against women and social policy issues.  

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